[Recipe] Earl Grey Mookie

[Recipe] Earl Grey Mookie

I know, I know what you're thinking. What the heck is a mookie. For those of you who have seen my Matcha Mochi Cookie post you can guess that is it my mochi cookie (moo-k-ie). Okay, I don't know if that name will stick but let me know what you guys think.

Matcha is an instant favorite in the food world and for a good reason too. But sometimes us food enthusiasts want something different with a tea flavor. Earl Grey is an up and coming favorite with hojicha and genmaicha trailing closely behind his greener older brother. I decided to tackle an earl grey cookie, earl Grey doesn't get the credit it deserves. I stuck with the mactha mochi cookie proportions but had two different methods for incorporating the tea flavor into the cookie. One is to just substitute ground tea leaves as a 1 to 1 substitute for Matcha powder. Another would be to seep the tea in warm milk, hopefully to get a more pronounced flavor. I set up an experiment and made my matcha mochi cookie as my control.

The Real Ramen Burger

The Real Ramen Burger

In 2013, the Ramen Burger crazy swept over America by Keizo Shimamoto and it was one of those "Why didn't I think of that..." creations. Immediately there were hundreds of recipes for the Ramen Burger and none of them felt right in my mind. I was able to try the Official Ramen Burger at a San Francisco Tofu Festival last year, and I have to admit, it was pretty damn good. I have never attempted making a Ramen Burger as I was always more interested in making the conventional soup and noodle ramen, but seeing bloggers and imitators making mediocre Ramen Burgers, I decided to see how I could fare.

The Matcha Mochi Cookie: Square One

The Matcha Mochi Cookie: Square One

Mochi cookies are a rare sight to see, but it is about time rice flour is the star of the show and takes its own form. A cookie that is crispy, smooth, chewy, light, and most importantly delicious. My original intent of engineering a mochi cookie was to... well engineer a cookie. I started with a Matcha Mochi Cupcake recipe that I knew was delicious. It had a crisp texture on top and a chewy mochi center. If i could increase the crispiness to chewy ratio I would have something great. I broke down the recipe and looked into the water, fat and protein content of all my ingredients keeping track of details such as an egg is composed of 66.6% egg whites, 90% of which is water. Where did this get me? I was left with a bunch of numbers on a spreadsheet, cookieless and sad. I just needed to start baking. It took me 4 trials to get to my Final Recipe.

Give Your Steak a Bath (Sous Vide)

Give Your Steak a Bath (Sous Vide)

Cooking a steak in water does not sound appetizing at all, but surprisingly this method yields one amazing piece of protein.

Steak itself is a tricky beast to tame. I can still remember my first encounter tackling this piece of meat. Fresh out of the dorms in college I started cooking for myself in my apartment. I mastered the art of stir frying chicken and broccoli passed down by my mother, but unfortunately that was the only skill I learned before I was left to fend for myself. Luckily my dad, the grill master, loves a juicy steak and packed me a Costco supply of steaks frozen for my convenience and to mix it up my meals a little. I took one slab of meat out, thawed it for a few hours, and called my dad for instructions to reassure myself that everything would be fine. "Salt and Pepper. Cook on one side for 4 minutes. Flip. Cook for 4 more minutes. A splash of soy sauce." And there you have it, the Chan Family secret for a perfect steak. Little did I know that there was more to it than that.